The NEW West Coast Swing

    September 8, 2009 Stan Utley 530 13 Comments

    Scotty Cameron has occasionally used the names of California towns to designate his putter line-up. This year the putter guru has decided to add a few new California towns (and putters) to his list of favorites. Four new models, aptly named the California Series, are set to be released at the end of September by Titleist and Scotty Cameron.  The four models are Coronado, Monterey, Sonoma and Del Mar.

    The most noticeable feature is the new finish. Scotty Cameron refers to it as “Honey Dipped.” The gold tone is created when the stainless steel heads go through a special heating process. Depending on the light, the California putters show flashes of pink and purple too.

    The visible appearance of a putter is very important. Pick a putter that has a flowing look because if anything looks sharp or out of place your eyes tends to go to it. Remember, the best putting pros on TOUR keep it simple and  need to feel comfortable over the ball. Choosing a putter that is not visually appealing will only distract you from making a good stroke.

    Two other subtle things help to keep the look of the new California Series putters clean. First, there are no steps in the shaft of the California putters. Second, the decorative shaft band has been placed on the back of the shaft near the handle. These details are designed to make it easier for your eyes to concentrate on the ball and your line at address.

    While Scotty Cameron may refer to the putters as “old world classic,” there is one modern feature built into the new line of putters. On the sole of each California model are two 10-gram weight screws. These screws are not designed to be removed or adjusted by the golfer. However, via custom order, they can be changed to create heavier versions of the putter using the same head.

    New-Putters-Models-by-Scotty-CameronAbout Each Putter (From top to bottom)

    • The Coronado is a classic blade putter with two steps in the back flange area. It
      features a single alignment dot on the top and a round neck.
    • The Monterey is a classic heel-toe weighted, Anser-style blade with a plumber’s neck and a single-line alignment aid.
    • The Sonoma also features a plumber’s neck and a single alignment line, but it has a rounded back flange and slightly longer face.
    • The Del Mar has a larger, circular back flange with a high toe area.

    To learn more about the new California Series putters visit www.scottycameron.com
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    13 Comments Leave New
    Jim Burnes October 6, 2009

    I will need to buy a new putter in going to your putting technique. Is there one of these Scotty Cameron’s you would suggest? I have fought the yips for many years.

    Thanks, Jim Burnes

    Reply
      Stan Utley October 6, 2009

      Jim…buying a new putter isn’t necessary as long as your current putter allows the toe of the putter to pass the heel as you take your putting stroke. Mallet putters can give you the rotation IF you focus on the toe-passing-heel at impact. The mass of a mallet style fights that a bit, but with practice I know that some of my students make it work for them.

      For many of my students though, a toe-down putter is better than a face-up putter. If you balance the shaft of your putter horizontally on your finger and the face of the putter points to the sky…this is a face-up, or face-balanced putter. Many putter models from Scotty Cameron, Odyssey, TaylorMade, Ping and others are face-balanced.

      If you take a Scotty Newport, Ping Anser or an Odyssey White Hot Tour #1 putter, try to horizontally balance the shaft on your finger and you’ll note that the putter toe will point partially down toward the floor. I find these putters are generally easier to use in the putting stroke that I teach.

      What is very important is to have confidence in your stroke and you need to feel comfortable as you stand over your ball as you putt. There are many models of putters from good companies that will likely work for you, and perhaps a Scotty Cameron model could be for you. Go to one of the wonderful stores in your area where you can pick up any putter on the rack and hit some balls on the practice green inside the store. Determine if it is face- or heel/toe-balanced, try several of each, and see how you feel as you stroke the ball. I hope this helps.

      Reply
    Keith Joel October 7, 2009

    Hi Stan,

    I notice you use a 36″ putter which is longer than most. I am 6’4″ and use a 35″ putter but have often felt a longer putter would help me relax more over the shot. What are your reasons for using a longer putter? Are any modification (lead tape) needed to be done to the putter to ensure the correct swing weight when adding length?

    Thanks,

    Keith

    Reply
      Stan Utley October 8, 2009

      Keith,

      The main reason that I have a 36″ Scotty Cameron is because when I started using Ping Ansers in 1982, their 35″ putters were within one-eighth inch of what Scotty calls 36″ now. Just one of those questions of where do you start measuring the length of a putter from, and what is really standard for off-the-rack putters these days.

      That said, I try and fit the putter so that when a student is in a comfortable address posture, they can grip their putter with slightly bent elbows. This helps them stay softer in the arms than if they have to staighten the elbows all the way out…whch they would have to do with a 34″ or possibly 35″ putter. Sounds like this could help you as well.

      Do be careful with weight. When you lengthen a putter, the swing weight goes up. I had weight taken out of my Scotty Cameron when I lengthened it so that the swing weight would stay the same (D2) as I’ve always had. That’s a very comfortable feel for me.

      Stan

      Reply
    Keith Joel October 7, 2009

    Hi Stan,

    I notice you use a 36″ putter which is longer than most. I am 6’4″ and use a 35″ putter but have often felt a longer putter would help me relax more over the shot. What are your reasons for using a longer putter? Are any modification (lead tape) needed to be done to the putter to ensure the correct swing weight when adding length?

    Thanks,

    Keith

    Reply
    Jim Burnes October 7, 2009

    Thanks Stan for your reply. I have read your new book from front to back and back to front and ready to start leaning your techniques. I had a partial knee replacement in May and just starting to play again. On my putter, it is definetely face balanced so sounds like it is best to go with a heel/toe weighted one. I did a SAM PuttLab fittting last summer at Miles of Golf in Ann Arbor and found my ball was jumping quite a bit at impact and actually rotating backwards. They bend my new putter to 2 degrees loft. I know Scotty Cameron’s are pricey so I will start looking at all options. I use left hand low and was wondering if I should go back to conventional and if your putting method works for someone with a long history of the yips. I would appreciate your thoughts.

    Thanks, Jim (My mother lived at Sun Lakes in Chandler for several years and I know what you mean about the great weather on your one video from Grayhawk.)

    Reply
    Jim Burnes October 7, 2009

    Thanks Stan for your reply. I have read your new book from front to back and back to front and ready to start leaning your techniques. I had a partial knee replacement in May and just starting to play again. On my putter, it is definetely face balanced so sounds like it is best to go with a heel/toe weighted one. I did a SAM PuttLab fittting last summer at Miles of Golf in Ann Arbor and found my ball was jumping quite a bit at impact and actually rotating backwards. They bend my new putter to 2 degrees loft. I know Scotty Cameron’s are pricey so I will start looking at all options. I use left hand low and was wondering if I should go back to conventional and if your putting method works for someone with a long history of the yips. I would appreciate your thoughts.

    Thanks, Jim (My mother lived at Sun Lakes in Chandler for several years and I know what you mean about the great weather on your one video from Grayhawk.)

    Reply
    Ryan Gutz November 1, 2009

    Hey Stan this doesn’t have to do with these putters, but I wanted to know before I go out and do it, how does adding loft on your putter help you?

    Reply
    Ryan Gutz November 1, 2009

    Hey Stan this doesn’t have to do with these putters, but I wanted to know before I go out and do it, how does adding loft on your putter help you?

    Reply
    stephen racine December 26, 2009

    Hey Stan,

    I’ve really enjoyed all of your books and they have helped my game tremendously. Your methods have done wonders for my short game, especially my pitching and chipping. Do you think you will ever do a video on “The Art of the Short Game?” I bought your “Learning the Curve” DVD after reading your first book and it really helped me to visualize the technique. I’ve watched every short video that has surfaced on Youtube but was hoping that you may do a full length DVD. Thanks for the help with my game!!!!

    Steve

    Reply
      Stan Utley December 27, 2009

      Steve,

      Thanks so much for using my books and The Learning Curve/DVD to help your game. I’m really thankful for fans like you who have a strong desire to improve your games, and who believe my teaching methods are helping you get better. It’s why I so enjoy doing what I do…thanks again for your feedback.

      With my commitments to teaching golf professionals, emerging talent in the college ranks, as well as amateurs who visit with me at Grayhawk in Scottsdale, time constraints for shooting video make it tough. But, recently I’ve been working with a company called MyContent.com. As part of teaching curriculum we put together, I shot 4 separate videos to cover key elements of the game to which I’ve dedicated my teaching career…all focused on short game techniques: putting, chipping, pitching and bunker play. You can go to http://www.mycontent.com/stanutleygolf/#product=3158 to learn more about how you can obtain these short-game videos. I hope to add depth to each area of the short game on the MyContent.com site, with more video “chapters” covering additional tips as soon as I can get a few days to shoot more video footage. Whenever we do that, we’ll announce it on my web site..

      Thanks again for your support and your kind comments. I hope you enjoy my website. You can also find me on Facebook and on Twitter.

      Stan

      Reply